Dating intimacy advice

You've done it, you're doing it, you'd like to do it, or you need to teach somebody else how to do it. It is considered the natural precursor to marriage, and is generally considered something to be desired, whatever form it might take. If you were to Google the word "matchmaker," you would receive something in the neighborhood of 12,100,000 responses — with a few of these outfits claiming to be Christian, but most making no such claim. As evangelical Christians, we're called to be distinct in the ways we think and act about all issues that confront us and those around us. Granted, not all of these people are evangelicals, but we're not doing so well either. How can Christians think differently about this pervasive issue in media and culture? The answer to that last question is "not well." Surveys consistently indicate that professing Christians behave almost exactly like non-Christians in terms of sexual involvement outside of marriage (in both percentage of people involved and how deeply involved they are — how far they're going), living together before marriage, and infidelity and divorce after marriage. Relax, take a deep breath and follow some of these tips to help you through.

The Torah (Leviticus ) speaks of a "Covenant of Salt," where God instructs us to use salt on all the offerings as if to say that His covenant with us is eternal, sealed with salt.

Since salt never spoils, it is a symbol of indestructibility.

Our goal in dating as Christians is to save marital levels of interaction for marriage itself; to care well for the other person's soul, to be different from the world and so to bring glory to God.

This time, I want to apply some of the same principles we've been thinking about to a relationship that moves beyond the "early stages" and gets serious.

At some point in most monogamous, over-60 relationships, the issue of whether or not to live together comes up.

Last modified 05-Apr-2017 21:44